15.07.2020

DEINOVE (Euronext Growth Paris: ALDEI), a French biotech company that uses its lead generation platform to develop innovative anti-infective drugs, is pursuing the Phase II clinical trial of its antibiotic candidate DNV3837, in a context where U.S. hospitals are still fighting the COVID-19 pandemic. The Company thanks the clinicians for their commitment to this trial, as they face an unprecedented health crisis.

DNV3837 targets the treatment of Clostridioides difficile gastrointestinal infections (CDI), a pathogen classified as urgent threat by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). A Phase II clinical trial, launched in early 2020 in the United States, is evaluating the efficacy of DNV3837 in patients, following promising Phase I data. To date, DEINOVE is the only French biotech with a small molecule in clinical development, fully owned by the company, in the field of antibiotics.

This trial continues in the United States despite the COVID-19 outbreak. Several of the investigation centers have maintained their clinical research activities and continue to screen and include patients. DEINOVE scientific team and the CRO Medpace are closely monitoring the situation.

« We are grateful to the clinicians for doing their utmost to ensure that the clinical trial runs smoothly. We are surrounded by a team that is aware of the therapeutic stakes and the potential of our solution in development, and we thank them for this. In the current health conditions in the United States, where hospitals are overcrowded, we could have feared a suspension of the trial, » says Dr. Yannick Plétan, Acting Chief Medical Officer responsible for the clinical trial. « Conversely, the COVID-19 outbreak - which mainly affects the elderly - and the heavy antibiotic treatments administered to combat possible bacterial co-infections, are factors conducive to the development of severe Clostridioides difficile infections targeted by DNV3837. We are concerned, however, about the irrational use of antibiotics, which would have long-term public health consequences. »

On June 1st of this year, the WHO warned of the increasing rates of antimicrobial resistance, boosted by the current health crisis. " The COVID19 pandemic has led to an increased use of antibiotics, which ultimately will lead to higher bacterial resistance rates that will impact the burden of disease and deaths during the pandemic and beyond,", worried Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General*. According to him, the threat of antimicrobial resistance is "one of the most urgent challenges of our time ". He also recalled that only small proportion of COVID-19 patients need antibiotics to treat subsequent bacterial infections.

 

* https://www.who.int/dg/speeches/detail/who-director-general-s-opening-remarks-at-the-media-briefing-on-covid-19---01-june-2020